The problem with fundamentalism in the world today

by on April 19, 2017 in International affairs

In the run up to the Iraq war President Bush made a lot of speeches in which he denounced the “aggression” of Saddam Hussein. It was evident that that was a serious case of ‘political projection’ – accusing the other of what you yourself are doing. (Since under Bush the US launched an illegal invasion against a sovereign country which was no threat to them, killing tens of thousands in the process: the very definition of state aggression).

The present administration is doing the same thing. For example, this is Secretary of State Tillerson:

Whether it be assassination attempts, support of weapons of mass destruction, deploying destabilizing militias, Iran spends its treasure and time disrupting peace

Substitute ‘America’ for Iran and you are right there.

Or:

Iran is the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism, and is responsible for intensifying multiple conflicts and undermining US interests in countries such as Syria, Yemen, Iraq and Lebanon, and continuing to support attacks against Israel

could be:

The US is the world’s leading state aggressor, and is responsible for intensifying multiple conflicts and undermining Iran’s interests in countries such as Syria, Yemen, Iraq and Lebanon, and continuing to support attacks against the government of Syria

 

But; their might is right and anyone else’s might is evil. This is ‘exceptionalism’ again. Basically; the US has no intention of negotiating with anyone. They just plan to use their superior force to get their way. It is that simple.

It is little talked about but the biggest fundamentalists in the world today – and certainly the best armed – are the children of the Pilgrim Fathers. They think that God is on their side. They think that what is good for America is good for the world. They think that anyone who doesn’t get this is dwelling in some dark age and it is fine to bomb them.

And we know that fundamentalism can lead to wars.

 

 

 

 

 

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